Customers Want A Tasty Cocktail Without the Buzz

Stirred, not slurred—that’s the slogan for Curious Elixirs’ new line of non-alcoholic mocktails.

A cocktail without the buzz may not seem buzz-worthy, but the non-alcoholic beverage market amounts to $280 million, according to Statista. The industry expects growth by 7.1% this year. The non-alcoholic drink market, which does include soft drinks, is expected to be valued at more than $2 billion by 2022, according to Allied Market Research.

Consumers now want non-alcoholic drink options for either mid-week sips or because they’re exploring a sober lifestyle for health reasons. Some of the non-alcoholic drink companies dub this month “Sober October.” The idea is similar to Dry January; people who partake spend the entire month not drinking alcoholic beverages.

“Forecasters expect COVID-19 to accelerate the decline of booze consumption in the U.S. As fewer people visit bars, restaurants, and sporting venues, retail purchases have increased, but overall intake has been dropping,” Bloomberg reports. “The drinks industry is responding with an onslaught of non-alcoholic spirits whose flavors evoke those found in traditional bottles. ” (more…)

How COVID-19 Is Affecting Wine Around the World

Each country’s individual handling of the pandemic is affecting how the wine industry is rebounding. But even the countries which have managed to control the COVID-19 outbreak are still suffering from the global economy and tourism industry flailing.

Around the world, wine-producing powerhouses such as New Zealand, Napa Valley, France, and Australia are all having to deal with the challenges the pandemic has imposed upon the wine industry.

Things are so bad some countries are even transforming their wine into hand sanitizer. Let’s take a look how some wine-oriented countries are handling the pandemic: (more…)

How To Use Podcasts To Increase Wine and Liquor Sales

You may be surprised to learn that some people walking around with headphones on are not listening to the latest Taylor Swift album, but are instead learning about the latest liquor industry news and gaining a few mixology tips.

One hundred forty-four million Americans listen to podcasts, and there’s no shortage of great drink podcasts that provide mixology tips, industry news, and more.

Businesses spent a total of $497 million on podcast advertising in 2018, according to Small Biz Genius. But with the abundance of podcasts seeking sponsorship, liquor companies can benefit from joining that club to gain customers and increase brand awareness. 54% of podcast consumers say they think about buying products advertised during the podcast, making this a new possible revenue channel for brands. (more…)

10 Ways to Get More Beverage Alcohol Customers During The Pandemic

The waiter works in a restaurant in a medical mask, gloves during coronavirus pandemic. Representing new normal of service and safety. Putting the order, meals and drink, wine. Close up.Customers don’t want to try something new right now. Sales for well-known brands have sky-rocketed, leaving smaller brands, restaurants, and bars behind.

“People are buying more, but cheaper and commercial stuff. They’re not willing to take a risk and try something different right now,” Juan Quintero, a partner in the liquor store Whiskey and Wine in Manhattan, told The New York Times.

The National Restaurant Association’s survey estimates that the restaurant and foodservice industry lost nearly $120 billion in sales during the first three months of the pandemic, according to ABC News. Eateries and bars raked in $38.6 billion in sales in May, on a seasonally-adjusted basis, but that’s down $27 billion from January and February of this year, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Now wineries, restaurants, and bars are trying to recover. (more…)

Will Bars Ever Be the Same After COVID-19?

Spending Friday evening sipping on a glass of wine inside a trendy wine bar or mingling at the local pub seems to be a luxury of the past.

Since COVID-19 began ravaging the United States in March, indoor dining and drinking have been closed in many states. Those states that do allow indoor dining do so at limited capacity.

The National Restaurant Association conducted a survey that estimates the restaurant and food service industry lost nearly $120 billion in sales during the first three months of the pandemic, according to ABC News. Eateries and bars raked in $38.6 billion in sales in May, on a seasonally-adjusted basis, but that’s down $27 billion from January and February, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. (more…)

Consumers Are Seeking Out Black-Owned Wines – Here’s Why You Should Too

Since the death of George Floyd in May, Black Lives Matter protests have flooded the streets across the country. In Corporate America and across a multitude of industries, companies are pledging to devote more resources towards and focus on Black brands, Black entrepreneurs, and Black-owned businesses.

In the wine industry, there are only about 11,000 Black-owned wineries, but this small contingent is powerful, and they are making unique, delicious vintages.

“Wine and the wine industry has historically been a white man’s world, and that’s changing quickly,” Robin and Andréa McBride, who founded The McBride Sisters, told Forbes in 2018. “We encourage the wine consumer to explore outside of the old expectations of wine.”

(more…)

Liquor Laws Change in Response to Demand for Delivery During Pandemic

Despite rising COVID-19 cases, most of the governors in the United States have lifted stay-at-home orders. But some states such as Texas have now banned bars from serving alcohol to keep the infectious virus at bay.

The unprecedented stay-at-home orders and whiplash of phased reopening starting and pausing have left customers craving their favorite cocktail, and disgruntled brands looking for new revenue streams.

In response, some state legislatures are working to change their laws to allow alcohol delivery.

Many states forbid shipping wine and spirits, halting the growth of delivery giants such as Drizly and hampering direct-to-consumer efforts from wineries and distilleries.

During the pandemic, residents tried to stay home, but the demand grew for happy hours at home and delivery. (more…)

Will Wineries Ever be the Same After COVID-19?

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way people work, live, travel, and drink.

All 50 states have started to ease restrictions and stay-at-home orders, but the pandemic may affect the luxury wine industry for years to come. Napa Valley vineyards began opening in early June, but things will look different with social distancing measures in place and likely only local visitors.

Most wineries will now require employees and guests to wear masks, and visitors will need to make reservations. With restrictions and fear of travel, is enotourism dead? (more…)

Millennials Have No Taste for Premium Wine

Cheerful group of happy female people clinking and toasting together with friendship and happiness - young and adult women have fun eating - food and beverage celebration concept

Mom and Dad are willing to pay up for a quality cab, but their children are saying, “No more.”

Premium wine, defined as wine priced at more than $10 a bottle, is “nearing its apex as a trend, indicated by the decline in total wine sales volume,” according to Silicon Valley Bank’s annual report on the wine industry.

The category is falling because of the difficulty in passing price increases on to consumers, and too many grapes. The current global pandemic, which is resulting in record unemployment rates, isn’t helping either.

“With an oversupply and the fact that price increases are nearly impossible against the backdrop of slowing sales, the trend and mantra of premiumization that pushed volume and price higher for the past 25 years is nearing an end,” Silicon Valley Bank’s report said. (more…)